Skip to content

Isolation and God

January 17, 2021

Isolation at Glacier Point, CA, Author Ben Bowens rndmben13, Source https://unsplash.com/photos/ooxY4kyg79g (CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication)

During this coronavirus pandemic, many have experienced loneliness, isolation, and alienation.  The following is excerpted from an articled titled “We Belong to God – and one another” by Joseph Venerosa which appeared in the March/April 2019 edition of Maryknoll Magazine:

“…One of the ironies of modern life is that while the world is more populated than ever, people feel more isolated and alienated from one another.  One of the worst feelings is of not belonging…

In the Gospels, we see Jesus…going to the margins of society, to the sinner and outcast, the sick and the poor, and accepting people where they are, without preconditions, and making them family….So when did we become such strangers to one another – and to God?”

“…[W]e feel far from God, who is always looking for us, even when we, like Adam, try to hide because of our sin…Over and over again, the Bible recounts tales of God seeking out wayward humans…

Biblical accounts of banishment, exile, wandering and exodus underscore the basic human condition of alienation.  We don’t feel like we belong – anywhere.  Like strangers in a strange land, we yearn for some paradise lost long before we were born.  But are we really lost?  Or is that sense of being far from God (who is everywhere) just the illusion…caused by sin?

Over the centuries humans have come up with more and more elaborate rituals to try to restore the relationship with the God who never went away.  Sin blinds us to the truth that there is absolutely nothing we can do to make God stop loving us.

The Incarnation is the coming forth of God to be with us in our self-imposed exile.  While the Crucifixion is humanity’s ultimate ‘No!’ to God, the Resurrection is God’s eternal ‘Yes!’ to us.  Salvation is the blessed realization that we belong to God and to one another.  Our sense of alienation evaporates when we accept that God really loves us.”

READERS CAN FIND MY VIEWS ON ABUSE AND ABUSE-RELATED ISSUES AT ANNA WALDHERR A Voice Reclaimed, Surviving Child Abuse  https://avoicereclaimed.com

12 Comments
  1. This is beautiful! I needed to read this right now, Anna. Thank you! ❤

  2. Wow, thanks for the above, Anna.

    Strange, just yesterday I listened on the radio to the Beatles’ ‘Eleanor Rigby’ and decided to print out the lyrics… ‘Ah, look at all the lonely people… All the lonely people, Where do they all come from?’ And the powerlessness and irrelevance of Father McKenzie (and the Church) at the time.

    As always, you have pointed us in the right direction and to the ultimate answer.

    • I am happy you enjoyed the post, Erroll. I was especially struck by the author’s observation that the Bible is filled w/ wanderers who exemplify man’s alienation from God.

  3. G’day Anna, thank you for sharing.

    “The Incarnation is the coming forth of God to be with us in our self-imposed exile. While the Crucifixion is humanity’s ultimate ‘No!’ to God, the Resurrection is God’s eternal ‘Yes!’ to us.” – This is so good!

    Stay connected to the Vine.

  4. Amen! What wonderful truth you have so beautifully written.🙏🏻❤️

  5. “While the Crucifixion is humanity’s ultimate ‘No!’ to God, the Resurrection is God’s eternal ‘Yes!’ to us.”
    Those are great words!

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Isolation and God | Talmidimblogging

Leave a Reply to errollmulder Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: